The Holographic Universe, Perceiving Reality!

The holographic universe is a book by Michael Talbot, (1953-1992), he was also the author of a number of books highlighting parallels between ancient mysticism and quantum mechanics, and espousing a theoretical model of reality that suggests the physical universe is akin to a giant hologram.

The main architects of this astonishing idea were two eminent thinkers, the first one was David Bohm, a protege of Einstein, physicist in the University of London and one of the world’s most respected quantum physicists. The second was Karl Pribram, a neurophysiologist at Stanford University and author of the classic neuropsychological textbook Languages of the Brain.

The most interesting part is both Bohm and Pribram worked in two different fields and arrived at the same conclusion from two very different directions. Bohm became convinced of the universe’s holographic nature only after years of dissatisfaction with standard theories’ inability to explain all of the phenomena encountered in quantum physics.

Pribram became convinced because of the failure of standard theories of the brain to explain various neurophysiological puzzles. Anyway, enough of that talk its kind of difficult to understand these principles when you have not experienced shifts in the space time continuum in your head.

These two videos will explain the part of the holographic universe and how our brain perceives, its a very well made video to enable understanding of these principles.

Earlier I had written on a Conscious and Participatory universe, where we had quoted Gregg Braden, and included a couple of his interviews, this video bridges the gap in understanding our place in the holographic universe.

The experiment that kick started the entire concept of the holographic universe was Alain Aspects’ in 1982 at the University of Paris related to the EPR Experiment, a consciousness experiment which had been devised by Albert Einstein, and his colleagues, Poldlsky and Rosen, in order to disprove Quantum Mechanics on the basis of the Pauli Exclusion Principle contradicting Special Relativity.

Aspect and his team discovered that under certain circumstances subatomic particles such as electrons are able to instantaneously communicate with each other regardless of the distance separating them. It doesn’t matter whether they are 10 feet or 10 billion miles apart. Somehow each particle always seems to know what the other is doing.

The problem with this feat is that it violates Einstein’s long-held tenet that no communication can travel faster than the speed of light. Since traveling faster than the speed of light is tantamount to breaking the time barrier, this daunting prospect has caused some physicists to try to come up with elaborate ways to explain Aspect’s findings. But it has inspired others to offer even more radical explanations.

Resources:

The Holographic Universe

Please share, it really helps! :) <3

Clyde
Clyde
A Psychonaut who believes that humans have tremendous unharnessed powers within. To be immersed in the boundless gifts of nature and being self-sufficient is my Ikigai. With years of web tech experience, I founded and maintain Fractal Enlightenment.

10 COMMENTS

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
10 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Latest for Members

spot_img

Upcoming Events

You May Like

For Members

Nietzsche’s Eternal Recurrence, a Litmus Test for the Quality of your Life

What would it mean if you could say yes to everything that has happened in your life? Not being a foolhardy yes-person, but rather...

3 Timelines On A Multi-Dimensional Reality And How To Access Them

One sign you may be reaching up intuitively from 3D into 4, or even 5D as the shifts in energy intensify in to the...

Releasing the Wounds of the Divine Feminine to Enter our 5D Reality: For Women and Men

"Man is not the enemy here, but the fellow victim" ~ Betty Friedan As spring arrives in the Northern hemisphere you can always sense it....
spot_img
10
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x