“In the light of the near-death experience, death is nothing more than the illusion of separateness and finality, and those who can believe in this vision of death, like near-death experiencers themselves, lose all fear of it, for how can you fear that which does not exist?” ~ Dr. Kenneth Ring

Most of us purposefully forget the experiences of the afterlife so that we can better submerge ourselves in the complexities of life in order to achieve great heights and cherish life as much as we can.

Perhaps we are encouraged to swallow the pill of amnesia in order to avoid topping ourselves, for if we remembered how wonderful non-physical was in comparison to the hellish-like states of mind chatter most human adults put themselves through, then we’d surely all race to return to it.

However, what we do all have memory of when we put some effort in, is that life is a gift and our physical reality is one of pure joy; that is if we allow ourselves to experience it as such.

What accounts of the afterlife do, if anything, is to treat us to a little reminder that we must make the most of it, and try to approach life as a child; with loving innocence and an attitude of exploration.

Here are 4 common accounts that people experiencing near-death have brought back with them, accounts that remind us to breathe as if it were our last:

The visitation of deceased loved ones, Spirit Guides or ascended masters

‘There is no scientific explanation for the fact that while my body lay in coma, my mind—my conscious, inner self—was alive and well. While the neurons of my cortex were stunned to complete inactivity by the bacteria that had attacked them, my brain-free consciousness journeyed to another, larger dimension of the universe: a dimension I’d never dreamed existed and which the old, pre-coma me would have been more than happy to explain was a simple impossibility.’

An atheist Neurosurgeon fell into a coma when the e. coli bacteria flooded his brain and he lay in a vegetative state for several days.

When he awoke he reported that he had travelled to another dimension in the clouds where angel-like beings told him simple but loving messages. These messages included things like ‘You are loved and cherished, dearly, forever,’ and ‘You have nothing to fear.’


Many have reported that, on their way to death, they were spoken to by loved ones who had passed beyond the veil and gone non-physical decades before this experience. These loved ones or benevolent angels always had messages of hope and kindness, but also urged those experiencing this to make the most of life and for the person to return to their body and make a shift in attitude or to turn over a new leaf.

These people then returned to their bodies, knowing that it was not their time, and began the work they had really came here to do.

For the full article and account, read here

Life flashing before eyes

Many people have reported a life review that supposedly happens at the moment of death. It is meant to happen in a human heartbeat, but stretches in time so that the person experiences every single interaction and individual they have encountered in that lifetime simultaneously.

There are also reports that people re-experience both their emotional reaction at the time as well as the emotional reaction of the person they were interacting with.

Seeing the body below them

‘The further out of my body I got, the more clear the tone became. I had the impression it was like a road, a frequency that you go on … I remember seeing several things in the operating room when I was looking down. It was the most aware that I think that I have ever been in my entire life …’

Pam Reynolds became brain dead whilst undergoing surgery and experienced watching her body being operated on and going towards a bright light. One of the most interesting things that she describes is how coming back into her body was like being submerged into ice.

Other accounts of taking that distinct step from physical to non-physical include the sensation of being released from brambles or being lost in some dark woods and then, of the relief of suddenly finding yourself home again.

For the full account, read here

Travelling towards the light

The account of Steve Gardipee of his near-death experience whilst fighting in the Vietnam war is interesting, not only because of the emotion he expresses when relaying the experience but also because of his succinct descriptions.

He describes how he experiences an intense and beautiful light and how he experiences the duality of being both a creator being and part of the whole yet simultaneously acknowledging that he is a tiny fragment of something mind blowingly big; something that the human mind or singular consciousness cannot understand on its own.

Despite the obviously Christian interpretation of an experience of a male God (perhaps we see what we believe), it’s particularly touching as he expresses how there isn’t a speck of darkness in heaven and that all there is for everyone is love.

He also points out that this is not in line with the God he was taught about and that the presence he experienced showed him his own ability to control his own life and the true essence of free will.

So, whether you believe in near-death experience and these accounts of the afterlife or not, you have to admit they’re pretty prevalent… and strangely familiar. They could be fabrications or flights of fancy. Perhaps they’re projections of the mind; dream states which occur when the body is shutting down for the last time.

My rational mind always pipes up when I read about such things, trying to deny them or wrap them in a healthy dose of cynicism, but then I remember the death I experienced (not first hand) but witnessed as a child and recall the sensations or love and reassurance and know (that there just might be), some truth to them.

Image source

Alex Grey art

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